The Modern Mix

The modern mix with with everyday ease is a playful style approach with an edge of glamour and unexpected pieces.

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The Michelle Dress from Council Wardrobe Studio is perfect for any summer occasion! It has full length sleeves and a drop waist creating a feminine, flirty vibe. It also comes with a detachable slip. Pair it with a statement necklace and gold accessories from Galleria Riverside to elevate the look.


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The floral print wrap dress by Ripley Rader from Council Wardrobe Studio makes any day a great one! The added drape and fabric create the

effortless look we all want. Made from their wrinkle-free microfiber - same at the RR classic jumpsuit - this is the perfect dress for travel. Pair it with distinctive gold bracelets from Galleria Riverside.


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The Ann Marie silk dress by Gold Hawk from Council Wardrobe Studio is both sexy and sweet. This silk blue and white check gingham slip dress is accented with lace. Wear it alone, with a little jacket, or a white tee under it. Great with a pair of sandals or open toed booties. The perfect dress for anyone's wardrobe.


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The lace-up trend has never been as versatile as the Hommage from Los Angeles black long sleeve lace-up top from The Teal Hanger Boutique. A classic collared neckline is met by a lace-up front design. Feel the positive energy by paring it with these white distressed denim shorts! These cool cutoffs have a mid-rise fit, and five-pocket cut complete with belt loops, top button and zip fly. Plenty of shredding gives way to frayed hems.

This soft black short sleeve shirt knit fabric by Ripley Rader from Council Wardrobe Studio creates a structured look but doesn't wrinkle. It is the perfect shirt to pair with MISA Los Angeles "Kayin" gingham cotton skort with tassel trim. The skort features a ruffled high-rise waist; high-rise, a self-tie bow belt, and a wrap silhouette. Orleans Windsor's lightweight sunglasses by Krewe Optical and Ikat silk clutch by Larkin Lane Designs from Council Wardrobe Studiob add a pop of color to this summer look.

VALENTINO The Emperor of Fashion

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During his 45-year career, haute couturier Valentino Garavani dressed everyone from Hollywood leading ladies (Gwyneth Paltrow, Julia Roberts) to beau monde beauties (Jackie Kennedy, Liz Taylor) to international royalty (Marie Chantal of Greece, Princess Diana). All wore his frothy evening confections, many in his signature red. Ultra-feminine, classy, and sophisticated are often words used to describe Valentino’s inimitable style. In all his years of designing, he is one of the few designers who has consistently maintained a formidable reputation.

During his 45-year career, haute couturier Valentino Garavani dressed everyone from Hollywood leading ladies (Gwyneth Paltrow, Julia Roberts) to beau monde beauties (Jackie Kennedy, Liz Taylor) to international royalty (Marie Chantal of Greece, Princess Diana). All wore his frothy evening confections, many in his signature red. Ultra-feminine, classy, and sophisticated are often words used to describe Valentino’s inimitable style. In all his years of designing, he is one of the few designers who has consistently maintained a formidable reputation.

Valentino was born in the city of Voghera in northern Italy, he showed an interest in fashion design at an early age and when he was old enough he moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts. Valentino worked for a few different designers in Paris after graduating, but returned home to Italy in 1959 to open his own fashion house. In 1960 the House of Valentino opened in Rome on the fashionable Via Condotti, he flew models in from Paris for his shows and it was here that he became well known for dresses done in a particular bright shade of red that has become known as “Valentino Red”.

It was during this time in 1960 that he met Giancarlo Giammetti, who abandoned his University studies of architecture to join Valentino at his design house becoming his business partner. Valentino’s breakthrough came with his first international show in Florence in 1962, this show put him on the big stage and he began dressing the jet set crowd.  So well-received was Garavani’s debut in 1962 in Florence that international orders and interest flooded in. He also received very favorable reviews in the press. His client list grew to include influential society ladies, and by the mid-‘60s he was considered the top dressmaker to women like Jackie O, Elizabeth Taylor, Gloria Guinness, and Princess Margaret, among many others. Jackie O was so enthralled by his designs that she commissioned the black mourning dresses she wore in the year following President Kennedy’s assassination, as well as her white wedding dress when she married Greek tycoon Aristotle Onassis.

In 1998, Garavani and Giammetti sold the brand to Gianni Agnelli for $300 million, after which it was sold again, this time to the Marzotto Group, at a loss. After Garavani’s retirement in 2007, the brand set up various memorial exhibits, including a virtual museum displaying his seminal works and a couture exhibit in London’s Somerset House. To this day, Garavani’s legacy lives on through his brand, by now a well-known international luxury brand, and through the media pieces done on his life, most notably ‘The Last Emperor,’ a popular documentary about his career.

He has been honored by the French Legion of Honour and has multiple other civic and design-related awards.

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VALENTINO’S RULES OF ENGAGEMENT

Get the mix right

"You should never invite people who don’t bring something different to the table, quite literally. Bring in people from other disciplines – from actors to footballer players, writers to bankers. You have to mix things up."


Set the scene

"Collecting china is one of my great passions. I like pieces that are old, important and simple. I used to be crazy for Russian china, and have a dealer in New York who sources this for me. I love Irish glass because it’s light and emits a soft yellow glow. In terms of linen, years ago I had the atelier who embroidered my gowns recreate those patterns onto cloth, all made in Italy. There’s a shop in London called Guinevere that is good for napkins; I like big napkins in dusty pink shades."

Smoke sparingly

"When I see those people hanging around outside a restaurant, shivering in little dresses in the cold; well, it’s the most depressing view ever. There are certain rules that should apply to the table, and not jumping up to smoke after each course is one of them. I was recently at a dinner for 12; we ended up just four of us sitting at table, with everyone else outside smoking. I think this is terrible. You can resist smoking for the length of a dinner."

Check the tech

"No one in my house is allowed to have a telephone ring at the table, but of course there are always texts, notifications, etc. Phones are dreadful at the table; someone might be telling you about their son and suddenly there’s a picture in front of your face, there’s the Instagram photos, the photos of the dog, the boyfriend. I can hardly send a text, can you imagine me on Instagram? No. Technology at the table makes guests feel isolated; with two people hunched over in the corner looking at photos or showing off a new app and excluding others. It’s upsetting."

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Cocktail hour

"Sometimes it’s nice to have someone waiting for your guests with a tray of cocktails, all dressed up and beautiful, but I think it’s more civilised to wait and ask what they would like to drink. I like the classic, old-fashioned way, with one of the staff of the house asking for your order instead of just handing you a glass. During the meal, it’s always a simple red or white, and I never change the wine during the meal no matter what is served."

Dress for the occasion

"You see these people when you are on holiday in a restaurant in a T-shirt or swimming  costume; my God, there’s nothing worse. Of course, dress codes depend on the situation. Sometimes it’s a black-tie occasion, sometimes it’s more relaxed, but a person should always be proper."


Festive frivolity

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"This is the time to unleash a touch of extravagance; it’s a time for opulence. People are celebrating and your entertaining should reflect that. In Italian families, it’s often the one time of the year when you can all gather around a table so the setting should be the most glamorous, you must take more care over what is around the dining room. At my home in the mountains, I have a flock of Meissen porcelain sheep on the table. The décor for the tree should be reflected on the table."

Most memorable gatherings

"It’s rare that someone remembers every detail of a meal; what I remember is the people, the mixing, the home, the light, the life. Diana Vreeland knew how to mix people. She threw a dinner for me and Giancarlo once. It was at her apartment in Park Avenue in her amazing red oriental chintz room; red floral-print fabric on sofas, walls, cushions, pillars – you were surrounded by beautiful pattern. No one was sitting formally around a table; instead, guests including Sophia Loren, Barbara Streisand and Jackie Kennedy, were all scattered on benches, chairs and sofas, which made for a very cosy occasion. I learned from a lot of wonderful women – and men – the art of receiving guests in your home, how to entertain, what to serve. I learned from their amazing taste."

Ode to a departed friend

"A lot of the people I learned from are sadly no longer with us and among the most amazing was my great friend Oscar de la Renta, who passed away this year. Along with his first wife Françoise and second wife Annette, he really was the host with the absolute most. Oscar was one of the few Americans who preferred to spend on a good chef rather than art; dining at his home was an incredible experience."

Dream dinner companion

"I’d like to have dinner with Queen Elizabeth. I’ve been to Buckingham Palace, but what I’d like is a small, private dinner where we could talk candidly. I would have loved to have met and enjoyed conversation with Jean Cocteau too. I recently sat with Nick Clegg and his wife at a dinner and found them very good people."

The importance of the invitation

"Of course, RSVP depends on the occasion, but it’s rude not to respond. Today nothing is done by paper, everything is email, but one used to send out a Save The Date and the actual invite. Always RSVP; it avoids confusion."

Letters of note

"I have a calligrapher in every country where I have home. For certain events, you want the place cards and the invites to look a certain way, to set the mood and tone. When I hosted the 2012 Love Ball with Natalia Vodianova at Wideville, the theme was ‘fairytale’ so the writing was very ornate, lots of swirls and romance. But sometimes it’s nice to have an elegant script written in a modern way."